trailer for “The End of the Line”

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Ever since I was a little, little girl, I use to tell people fishing was mean. and that if you kept fishing you’d fish the fish away. I guess I was right. bummer, I wish I was right about something good.

Our oceans are turning into plastic…are we?


By Susan Casey, Photographs by Gregg SegalCaptain Charles Moore

A vast swath of the Pacific, twice the size of Texas, is full of a plastic stew that is entering the food chain. Scientists say these toxins are causing obesity, infertility…and worse.


Fate can take strange forms, and so perhaps it does not seem unusual that Captain Charles Moore found his life’s purpose in a nightmare. Unfortunately, he was awake at the time, and 800 miles north of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean.

It happened on August 3, 1997, a lovely day, at least in the beginning: Sunny. Little wind. Water the color of sapphires. Moore and the crew of Alguita, his 50-foot aluminum-hulled catamaran, sliced through the sea.

Returning to Southern California from Hawaii after a sailing race, Moore had altered Alguita’s course, veering slightly north. He had the time and the curiosity to try a new route, one that would lead the vessel through the eastern corner of a 10-million-square-mile oval known as the North Pacific subtropical gyre. This was an odd stretch of ocean, a place most boats purposely avoided. For one thing, it was
becalmed. “The doldrums,” sailors called it, and they steered clear. So did the ocean’s top predators: the tuna, sharks, and other large fish that required livelier waters, flush with prey. The gyre was more like a desert—a slow, deep, clockwise-swirling vortex of air and water caused by a mountain of high-pressure air that lingered above it.

The area’s reputation didn’t deter Moore. He had grown up in Long Beach, 40 miles south of L.A., with the Pacific literally in his front yard, and he possessed an impressive aquatic résumé: deckhand, able seaman, sailor, scuba diver, surfer, and finally captain. Moore had spent countless hours in the ocean, fascinated by its vast trove of secrets and terrors. He’d seen a lot of things out there, things that were glorious and grand;
things that were ferocious and humbling. But he had never seen anything nearly as chilling as what lay ahead of him in the gyre.t began with a line of plastic bags ghosting the surface, followed by an ugly tangle of junk: nets and ropes and bottles, motor-oil jugs and cracked bath toys, a mangled tarp. Tires. A traffic cone. Moore could not believe his eyes. Out here in this desolate place, the water was a stew of plastic crap. It was as though someone had taken the pristine seascape of his youth and swapped it for a landfill.

How did all the plastic end up here? How did this trash tsunami begin? What did it mean? If the questions seemed overwhelming, Moore would soon learn that the answers were even more so, and that his discovery had dire implications for human—and planetary—health. As Alguita glided through the area that scientists now refer to as the “Eastern Garbage Patch,” Moore realized that the trail of plastic went on for hundreds of miles. Depressed and stunned, he sailed for a week through bobbing, toxic debris trapped in a purgatory of circling currents. To his horror, he had stumbled across the 21st-century Leviathan. It had no head, no tail. Just an endless body.

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Big lakes detected under Antarctica

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Lasers beamed from space have detected what researchers have long suspected: big sloshing lakes of water underneath Antarctic ice.

These lakes, some stretching across hundreds of square miles, fill and drain so dramatically that the movement can be seen by a satellite looking at the icy surface of
the southern continent, glaciologists reported in Thursday’s editions of the journal Science.

Global warming did not create these big pockets of water — they lie beneath some 2,300 feet of compressed snow and ice, too deep to be affected by temperature changes on the surface — but knowing how they behave is important to understanding the impact of climate change on the Antarctic ice sheet, study author Helen Fricker said by telephone.

About 90 percent of the world’s fresh water is locked in the thick ice cap that covers Antarctica; if it all melts, scientists estimate it could cause a 23-foot rise in world sea
levels. Even a 39-inch sea level rise could cause havoc in coastal and low-lying areas around the globe, according to a World Bank study released this week.

“Because climate is changing, we need to be able to predict what’s going to happen to the Antarctic ice sheet,” said Fricker, of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the
University of California, San Diego.

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Wind shifts devastate ocean life

By Jonathan Fildes

The delicate interplay between the oceans and atmosphere is changing with catastrophic consequences.

Entire marine ecosystems have been wiped out, devastating populations of sea birds and larger marine mammals.

These “dead zones” occur where there are disturbances to the nutrient-rich ocean currents, which are driven by coastal winds.

Extreme marine suffocations have occurred off the west coast of the US every year for the last five years. The most intense event, which left the ocean floor littered with the carcasses of crabs, happened in 2006.

It was unlike anything that we’ve measured along the Oregon coast in the past five decades,” said Dr Francis Chan, of Oregon State University.

Other coastal countries including Chile, Namibia and South Africa have also been affected.

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Gore Launches Live Earth Concerts to Fight Global Warming

Al Gore Announces Worldwide Global Warming ConcertsLOS ANGELES, California, February 15, 2007 (ENS) –

In an effort to engage billions of people across the globe to combat global warming, former Vice President Al Gore, Kevin Wall, Cameron Diaz and the MSN Network have launched Save Our Selves, SOS – The Campaign for a Climate in Crisis.

Its first event will be Live Earth, a 24-hour concert on 7/7/07 across all seven continents that will bring together more than 100 of the world’s top musical acts.

“In order to solve the climate crisis, we have to reach billions of people,” Gore said. “We are launching SOS and Live Earth to begin a process of communication that will mobilize people all over the world to take action.”

“The Climate Crisis will only be stopped by an unprecedented and sustained global movement,” said Gore. “We hope to jump-start that movement right here, right now, and take it to a new level on July 7, 2007.”

Live Earth is expected to engage an audience of more than two billion people through concert attendance and broadcasts.

The first 25 artists were announced Tuesday. They are: Pharrell, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Foo Fighters, Snoop Dogg, Lenny Kravitz, Bon Jovi, Paolo Nutini, Sheryl Crow, AFI, Melissa Etheridge, John Mayer, Damien Rice, Corinne Bailey Rae, Duran Duran, Snow Patrol, John Legend, Black Eyed Peas, Akon, Enrique Iglesias, Fall Out Boy, Maná, Keane, Kelly Clarkson, Korn, Faith Hill w/ Tim McGraw, and Bloc Party.

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